Tag Archives: Lifestyle Design

Digital Nomad Life Reinvention

Digital Nomad Reinvention

Have you ever wished you could reinvent yourself and start over? Maybe you’d start a new career, be more productive or act with more confidence. Wouldn’t it be great if you could get rid of all your old limitations and completely begin anew? Living as a digital nomad offers those opportunities on a regular basis. Relocating to a new city, particularly if it has a completely different culture, is an opportunity for a lifestyle makeover.

You Are Not In Control of Your Life

It’s can be very surprising to learn how much our cultures influence our lives. Our families, peers, societal norms and social status all have very strong control over what we do and strive for everyday. It’s difficult to understand if you’ve only lived in a single culture.

People don’t get tattoos and body piercings, wear the latest fashions, drive certain cars, purchase trendy products or join clubs and religious groups to stand out. We do those things to fit in.

This is very important. Most of us think we are unique and freely choosing everything we do and buy, but we are not. Even worse, those societal pressures that dictate our preferences all too often keep us …

The End of Work as We Know It

You Think Your Job is Bad?

In my recent Leisure Society post, I explored John Maynard Keynes idea of 15 hour workweeks and why we haven’t managed to cut back our work hours over the last century.  The fundamental question is whether or not having a job is still a necessary part of the human condition. The idea of employment is only a few centuries old, and I believe it’s outliving it’s usefulness. We are already seeing a shift to higher levels of permanent, structural unemployment and this is only the beginning. Are we still going to have jobs in the future?

What is Work?

One of the key issues is how the word ‘work’ is defined. If you follow Tim Ferris of the Four Hour Workweek you might be tempted to believe that if your occupation is fun, then it’s not work anymore. This definition is brilliant marketing that made Tim Ferris famous, however, judging by all that he accomplishes, it’s clear that puts in a lot more than 4 hours per week. That’s work no matter how much he enjoys it.

At the other extreme is the idea that any directed effort is work.This would include cleaning your house, raising children, washing your car …

The Coming Leisure Society: What if Money Didn’t Matter?

Leisure SocietyImagine you lived in a perfect society where you had enough food, clothing and shelter so you didn’t need to struggle to make a living. You’d have access to education, entertainment and a reasonable amount of goods and services. You’d be comfortable, but not rich in the conventional sense. If all your immediate needs were met and you didn’t have to work many hours, what would you do with your time?

This might seem like a pointless question to ask, but I believe it is a critical one of the 21st Century.

The Leisure Society

Back in 1930, during the great depression, the economist John Maynard Keynes wrote about a coming age of leisure and abundance.

I would predict that the standard of life in progressive countries one hundred years hence will be between four and eight times as high as it is to-day. There would be nothing surprising in this even in the light of our present knowledge.

Keynes was predicting that it would be possible to get to 15 hour workweeks by 2030 just from slow gradual improvements in productivity. After 83 years, it doesn’t seem like we’ve made much progress towards that age of leisure, however, …

Are Goals Foolish?

Goals

I’ve had a few people in the last year ask me about my goals for the future. I get questions like, “What does your ideal life look like?” or “Where do you want to be in 5 Years?” Questions like that imply that current life is inadequate and I should be striving for something more. What if I’m happy with my life now?

The Problem with Goals

I believe there is some value in setting goals and striving for more, but most goals and bucket list items seem to be superficial and self-serving. I don’t need a better job, more money, an advanced degree, more Twitter followers or a fancy house to be happy.

I don’t need to climb mountains, get lots of stamps in my passport or take up extreme sports. All of that is largely selfish and meaningless. I’m not trying to impress anyone, so why would I chase such silly pursuits?

There are many things I’d like to get more of, such as: health, knowledge and friends. Maybe I’d also like more patience, confidence and tolerance. However, none of those are an end goal, they are all part of how I choose to live my life.

I …

Simple Success Manifesto – My Latest Book

The JetSetCitizen Guide to Minimalism

Minimalism

Over the last four years, my wife and I have drastically reduced our consumption and material possessions. We weren’t trying to move towards some goal of a better life; it was more of an escape from a consumer lifestyle that we didn’t find fulfilling. I’ve recently been exploring the philosophy of minimalism and trying to contrast it with other related ideas like voluntary simplicity, simple living and frugality. This article is covers what I think is good and bad about those labels as well as how and why I’ve become a minimalist over the last four or five years.

Why I Don’t Like the Term ‘Minimalism’.

Although, I’m definitely not a big fan of labels, questions like “What do you do?” and “Where are you from?” are often easier to explain with the right terminology. I call myself a ‘digital nomad,’ and sometimes even, ‘location independent’ because those are probably the most efficient terms to describe my lifestyle.

Call yourself a ‘traveller’ and the inevitable question that gets asked is “How many countries have you been to?” Travel to me is not a contest of who has the most stamps in their passports or who has had the most authentic …

What does it mean to be a Good Human?

If you are reading this blog post, I think it’s safe to say that you are from a wealthy country and are probably looking to find more meaning and fulfillment in life. Finding purpose and a way to contribute to the world has certainly become the predominant focus of my life. The problem is that I still don’t know what that really means.

What are we trying to maximize?

Imagine that life were a quest to be the best we could be. What would we be trying to maximize?

Despite our actions, I would say that we are not trying to maximize such factors as:

  • number of hours of television watched
  • hour spent behind a desk in a cubicle
  • number of Tweets or Facebook updates
  • how fat we can get
  • total trash produced
  • volume of fossil fuels consumed
  • the size of our house
  • the speed of our cars
  • the number of stamps in our passports
  • the number of marathons we run

Those kinds of metrics seem somewhat foolish to mention as ultimate goals of being a good human, yet those types of activities end up taking a massive amount of our attention. Why is that?

What are Good Factors to

Interview with RTW traveller and long-term expat Tal Gur

In this interview, Tal Gur of BelowZerotoHero.com shares some insights into how travelling around the world has made him a better person. He also talks about how he has managed to build a largely passive income to fund his adventures. After six years in Australia and a 3 year round-the-world trip, Tal has now decided to set up a homebase in the US with his wife.

Interview with Tal Gur

Tal Gur of BelowZerotoHero.com

Please tell us about yourself?

I am originally from a Israel, though I feel at home in many places.

In 1996, aged 21, I took a long motorcycle trip in Australia and immediately fell in love. Years later I went back to complete my Masters degree in Information Management Systems and adopted Australia as a second home.

In 2009, after six blissful years in Australia, I packed a small backpack and left on a 3+ years ‘Round-The-World trip. I’m now in the process of adopting the U.S. as my new and third home. 🙂

What are your main websites about?

I own quite a few websites but the two main ones are Below Zero to Hero and Passively Free.

The first one has been crafted in the purpose of …

A Week in Chiang Mai – Photo Diary

Here is a selection of photos to show a little about what our life is like in Thailand. We tend to get into a routine and do the same things on a regular basis. Our life is simple, but very enjoyable. There isn’t a day that goes by that we aren’t grateful for the opportunities we have. We live in amazing times.

Visa Run to Myanmar

Every digital nomad knows this story well. After two or three months you have to travel to another country to renew visas for another short stay. Fortunately, visa runs are well established in Thailand and there are tours specifically for getting a new stamp in your passport. A day trip to Myanmar from Chiang Mai costs less than $20 with lunch and some sight-seeing included. Now we are good for another two months in Thailand.

Myanmar border

Visa run to the Myanmar border.

Great Thai Food

One of our favourite restaurants in Chiang Mai is Imm Aim (formerly Pun Pun). We go there 4 or 5 times a week because the food and atmosphere are great. I love small family run restaurants and the open garden is so relaxing. Imm Aim is a must try for …

Interview with Location Independent Copywriter John McIntyre

One of the best parts of being based out of Chiang Mai is the large digital nomad community here.  I don’t know of any other city in the world that comes close. It’s amazing to be able to connect with so many travellers and entrepreneurs. By far, the most dominant group of location independent entrepreneurs are the Dynamite Circle members from TropicalMBA.com. I recently had the opportunity to meet DC member and copywriter John McIntyre. John talks about his background, what makes Chiang Mai so great and gives some advice for aspiring copywriters in this interview.

John-McIntyre-working-Philippines

Please tell us about yourself?

I hail from the grand ol’ city of Sydney, Australia. But… I haven’t been there in over a year.

I never had a typical career and never wanted one. I jumped from casual job to casual job, moving around whenever I got bored. I had a knack for figuring things out quick. The problem was once I had it figured out, I lost interest. I did a lot of sales jobs. Both face-to-face and on the phone. The experience in sales has been incredibly valuable.

I played with online marketing on and off, but never got enough traction …